Vegan in D.C.

20-something vegan in The District chronicling her foodie adventures as she pursues health and happiness.

Why Afternoon May Be the Best Time to Exercise - New York Times

Does exercise influence the body’s internal clock? Few of us may be conscious of it, but our bodies, and in turn our health, are ruled by rhythms. “The heart, the liver, the brain — all are controlled by an endogenous circadian rhythm,” says Christopher Colwell, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles’s Brain Research Institute, who led a series of new experiments on how exercise affects the body’s internal clock. The studies were conducted in mice, but the findings suggest that exercise does affect our circadian rhythms, and the effect may be most beneficial if the exercise is undertaken midday.



My goal for 2013 is to have a more regulated exercise schedule — preferably five days a week in the morning. Morning work outs help wake me up and I don’t have to worry all day about getting exercising in after work. After reading this article, I’m thinking maybe I should make it a once-a-week goal to go on a short work during my lunch break. Then I think to myself, “Lunch break? Ha!” I usually take lunch at my desk.

When is your favorite time to work out? Is this a routine, or is your schedule more sporadic? Would your workplace allow you to take an hour break to exercise? I would love to know!

(Source: )

Day 1 of FitBit and I’m already addicted. Any Tumblr FitBit groups I should be privy to? *Like* this if you want to make one with me!

Day 1 of FitBit and I’m already addicted. Any Tumblr FitBit groups I should be privy to? *Like* this if you want to make one with me!

Today is shaping up to be pretty awesome. Our office surprised us with a full catered lunch, and one of the firm principals stopped in to give us our corporate Christmas gift—FitBits! Perfect timing to start off a new healthy year. I work for a boutique bi-coastal PR firm located in Seattle and D.C. We’ll be hosting competitions throughout the year to see  which office is more active. I am so excited.

About the FitBit One

The FitBit One is an activity and sleep tracker, kind of like a really fancy pedometer. The idea is that you wear it every day and it helps you optimize your activity levels. The best part about this tool is it’s web application that helps you crunch all of your health statistics. This review from PCWorld sums it up nicely: “The Fitbit service calculates and displays your daily activity breakdown, showing how long you’ve been sedentary, lightly active, fairly active or very active. Checking your results and setting new goals quickly becomes an addiction, helped along by a simple and straightforward user interface.”


I can’t wait to get started :)

(photos courtesy of FitBit.com and VentureBeat)

Nutrition Fact: Kimchi is one of the healthiest foods in the world. Many Americans believe traditional kimchi to be vegan but it is *not.*

How I Was Introduced to Kimchi
My best friend from college Kate spent almost a year-and-a-half teaching English in South Korea. When she recently visited me in D.C. she came back talking about tuk tuks, k-pop, Korean BBQ and KIMCHI. Whether she’s aware of it or not, Kate is a hype machine, and by the end of her four-day stay I had a strong desire to ride in a tuk tuk while blasting k-pop, eating Korean BBQ with a side of kimchi. I went to D.C.’s new Union Market, bought some kimchi from Oh!Pickles and so the kimchi love affair began.
What is kimchi exactly?
Kimchi, pronounced KIM-chee, is usually made with cabbage or daikon radishes, though Koreans sometimes use other vegetables — such as cucumbers and scallions — depending on the region and what’s in season. The vegetables are typically combined with garlic, ginger, chili pepper, salt, sugar and fish sauce, then fermented, giving the dish an acidic, tangy and spicy taste. (source) Koreans love kimchi so much that natives say “kimchi” instead of “cheese” when getting their pictures taken. (source)
What are kimchi’s health benefits?
Kimchi is loaded with vitamins A, B, and C, but its biggest benefit may be in its “healthy bacteria” called lactobacilli, found in fermented foods like kimchi and yogurt. This good bacteria helps with digestion, plus it seems to help stop and even prevent yeast infections, according to a recent study. And more good news: Some studies show fermented cabbage has compounds that may prevent the growth of cancer. (source)
Is kimchi vegan?
Traditionally, kimchi is not a vegetarian/vegan- friendly food. Some of kimchi’s base ingredients include fish sauce, salted shrimp, anchovy sauce or some kind of seafood. (source)
Not so fast! Awesome vegan kimchi products and recipes to try.
A simple Google search will assure you can still enjoy kimchi on a vegan diet. Below I’ve highlighted one product and one recipe for vegan kimchi that looked appealing.
Product: Mother In Law’s Vegan Napa Cabbage Kimchi - Not yet sold in D.C. grocery stores, but you can buy this product online.
Recipe: Vegan Kimchi As Good As The Real Thing - Serious Eats

Nutrition Fact: Kimchi is one of the healthiest foods in the world. Many Americans believe traditional kimchi to be vegan but it is *not.*


How I Was Introduced to Kimchi

My best friend from college Kate spent almost a year-and-a-half teaching English in South Korea. When she recently visited me in D.C. she came back talking about tuk tuks, k-pop, Korean BBQ and KIMCHI. Whether she’s aware of it or not, Kate is a hype machine, and by the end of her four-day stay I had a strong desire to ride in a tuk tuk while blasting k-pop, eating Korean BBQ with a side of kimchi. I went to D.C.’s new Union Market, bought some kimchi from Oh!Pickles and so the kimchi love affair began.

What is kimchi exactly?

Kimchi, pronounced KIM-chee, is usually made with cabbage or daikon radishes, though Koreans sometimes use other vegetables — such as cucumbers and scallions — depending on the region and what’s in season. The vegetables are typically combined with garlic, ginger, chili pepper, salt, sugar and fish sauce, then fermented, giving the dish an acidic, tangy and spicy taste. (source) Koreans love kimchi so much that natives say “kimchi” instead of “cheese” when getting their pictures taken. (source)

What are kimchi’s health benefits?

Kimchi is loaded with vitamins A, B, and C, but its biggest benefit may be in its “healthy bacteria” called lactobacilli, found in fermented foods like kimchi and yogurt. This good bacteria helps with digestion, plus it seems to help stop and even prevent yeast infections, according to a recent study. And more good news: Some studies show fermented cabbage has compounds that may prevent the growth of cancer. (source)

Is kimchi vegan?

Traditionally, kimchi is not a vegetarian/vegan- friendly food. Some of kimchi’s base ingredients include fish sauce, salted shrimp, anchovy sauce or some kind of seafood. (source)

Not so fast! Awesome vegan kimchi products and recipes to try.

A simple Google search will assure you can still enjoy kimchi on a vegan diet. Below I’ve highlighted one product and one recipe for vegan kimchi that looked appealing.

2013 is fast approaching. That means one year of vegan awesomeness for your girl LC. (I hope.) I’ve been doing loads of research to prepare me for this quest and I’ve had to confront some hard questions along the way. Like, how am I going to get my savory breakfast fix without my beloved eggs? Well, friends… I think tofu scramble is the answer.

I found the recipe on Vegan Yack Attack. This blog is actually new to me, but after looking around I was easily swayed to add this to my ever-growing vegan blog roll. Another tofu scramble recipe I liked came from Post Punk Kitchen. I haven’t made this dish yet, but I will be sure to make a follow-up post when I do. 

In the meantime, if any of you have a favorite savory vegan breakfast recipe I am all ears.

Author: Jackie of Vegan Yack Attack
Recipe type: Entree, Breakfast
Prep time:  15 mins
Cook time:  15 mins
Total time:  30 mins
Serves: 2
 
A hearty, tasty, but healthy breakfast scramble that’s a perfect meal for two!
Ingredients
  • ½ tsp. Coconut Oil
  • ⅓ Cup Orange Bell Pepper, Seeded and Diced
  • ½ Cup Packed Kale, Rib-less and chopped
  • ¼ Cup Green Onions, Diced
  • 1-14 oz. Block Extra-Firm Tofu, Pressed for 10-15 mins.
  • ½ Cup Tomato, Diced
  • 1 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. Nutritional Yeast
  • ¼ tsp. Onion Powder
  • ¼ tsp. Garlic Powder
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • ⅛ tsp. Black Pepper
  • A pinch of Dulse Seaweed Flakes
  • ¼ Cup Avocado, Diced
  • Optional: ¼ tsp. Turmeric for Color
Instructions
  1. Warm a large pan over medium heat, once hot, melt the coconut oil in the pan.
  2. Add the bell pepper, kale, and green onions to the pan and saute until the kale turns a bright color and very slightly wilted. This will take roughly 3 minutes.
  3. Next, crumble the block of tofu over the pan into (approx.) ½” chunks, folding it into the vegetables.
  4. Stir the tomatoes, nutritional yeast, salt, pepper, garlic and onion powder into the pan and let simmer over low-medium heat for 2-3 minutes.
  5. Add the dulse flakes and diced avocado to the scramble, along with the turmeric if you use it, and stir it in long enough to heat the avocado.
  6. Serve the scramble warm with some extra green onions on top, or fill a toasted tortilla with it and have a breakfast burrito!
Notes
Vitamin A: 85% Vitamin C: 109% Calcium: 28% Iron: 36%
Nutrition Information
Calories: 305 Fat: 16.5 Saturated fat: 4.2 Carbohydrates: 12.4 Sugar: 2.8Fiber: 6.2 Protein: 24.6
My friend Mallory is giving her Boston beau the most genius foodie gift for the holidays.
Bourbon Barrel-Aged Pure Maple Syrup (vegan, y’all), the Smitten Kitchen Cookbook (check out this blog if it’s not on your radar, not vegan focused but you’ll definitely be inspired) and this adorable print (above) from Marc John’s Society6 shop. Too cute.

My friend Mallory is giving her Boston beau the most genius foodie gift for the holidays.

Bourbon Barrel-Aged Pure Maple Syrup (vegan, y’all), the Smitten Kitchen Cookbook (check out this blog if it’s not on your radar, not vegan focused but you’ll definitely be inspired) and this adorable print (above) from Marc John’s Society6 shop. Too cute.

This blog is…

This blog is…